Y’all may be shocked, but I enjoy an occasional movie just like the rest of you mortals. Sometimes I like to escape the boring mundaneness of my life and make believe I’m travelling among the stars hundreds of years in the future, or that I’m reliving history in an era we like to imagine was more exciting than our own.

To fulfill these entertainment “needs,” I tap into the practically inexhaustible resources of Youtube, Hulu or similar sites. Generally speaking, I stick to pre-1965 shows. The reason is that I watch these shows in order to escape from reality, not to have the diversity agenda shoved into my face. I understand that each of us has our point of view, and that this includes writers and producers. That’s all fine and well, but just as I wouldn’t appreciate seeing a McDonalds or a Pepsi product strategically placed in a movie about Genghis  Khan, so too do I not appreciate having token blacks shoved in my face in Gladiator, Thor, The Hobbit and others too numerous to count. Before 1965 or so, movie producers could focus almost exclusively on the story. They weren’t bogged down by the dictates of the diversity cult.

With the exception of background characters (such as in The Hobbit), the token black’s role is carefully scripted. The producers don’t want to be too obviously Afro-centric, or they’ll pay the price at the box-office. But they must include at least one prominent black character – and he (it’s usually a man) must be portrayed in a positive light. Typically, we find him sacrificing himself to save the lives of others.

The 2003 movie Core is typical. In Core, Delroy Lindo plays Ed Brazzelton, in the end:

After some calculations, they decide that by splitting their nuclear weapons into the remaining compartments and jettisoning each at specific distances, they can create a “ripple effect“, where the power of each bomb will push against the blast of the next, generating the needed energy wave. However, because Virgil was not designed to jettison undamaged compartments, the plan requires someone to deactivate a safety switch that is in an area exposed to the extreme temperatures. Brazzelton volunteers and deactivates the switch, dying shortly afterwards.

There are exceptions to this rule. For example, in the movie Unbreakable, the villain is black, while the hero is white. It’s worth noting, however, that Unbreakable was “written, produced, and directed by M. Night Shyamalan.” Shyamalan also wrote, produced and directed The Village, which is clearly pro-white. Since Shyamalan himself is not white, but Indian, he can actually get away with producing an occasional pro-white film – though I’m fairly certain even he has taken some heat for it.

What kind of role will this black man have in Pompeii?

pompeii

He will speak of his family back in Africa. He will be a victim of oppression, probably having been captured as a slave or gladiator fighter. He’ll be a sympathetic character, providing wisdom to his white friends. In some way, he’ll probably end up a martyr.

Blacks were not unknown in ancient Rome. It would be perfectly acceptable to include one or two black faces in Pompeii, but against the backdrop of Hollywood’s predictable racial policies, the presence of such prominent characters is as distracting as if they’d had a Starbucks on every corner in Pompeii. It’s product-placement, and a stark reminder of TODAY’S politics. It should not be thrust upon us within the context of this historical drama. I wouldn’t be surprised if some black people feel the same way. They too want to experience the story of Pompeii, not to be reminded of racial quotas and the demands of the black lobby.

With the advance of video technology, it’s now possible to create entire movies without using actual human actors. More importantly, this technology is becoming increasingly available to those of us who are not wealthy and powerful. Hopefully, the ranks of those whose minds are free of the diversity cult will produce some talented animators. If so, we’ll be able to enjoy high-quality movies that are not beholden to the rigid racial rules of Hollywood. We can make our own Pompeii – or digitally remove the diversity from the current Pompeii and share it on our own “white market.” The authorities will fume, but there won’t be much they can do about it.

 

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