Most people can watch television or movies for hours on end, and never even suspect they’re being indoctrinated. They mindlessly stare at commercials, sitcoms and talk-shows in the belief that all they’re absorbing is the surface message each program is ostensibly designed to impart; it never occurs to them that repetitive exposure to deified black males, and denigrated white males, can possibly have an effect on their psyche.

Ignorance can be bliss. The ability to remain oblivious means that they do not own their own minds, and that their opinions are tainted and compromised. On the other hand, they escape the stress that the rest of us experience when exposed to such mind-control techniques.

My blood-pressure is typically as perfect as can be. In fact, it’s amazingly consistent. I recently had to wear a HAZMAT suit as part of emergency training. After spending almost half an hour in that cumbersome suit, not being able to turn my head, not being able to see properly, having to breath through a special apparatus and being subject to heat and humidity – my blood-pressure remained exactly as it’s always been.

This morning I had a doctor’s appointment. It was a routine physical and I wasn’t stressed in the least when I walked in. But I had to sit in the waiting room for about twenty minutes. In this waiting room was a television, which was playing one of those mindless pop-TV shows. They were interviewing a black basketball player and otherwise wallowing in the superficialities of celebrity culture. The television was not even visible to me, but I heard it loud and clear.

I was not in my element – and directly thereafter, when the attendant took my blood-pressure, it read considerably higher than normal. I had him remeasure it just to make sure. At the end of my visit, over an hour later, after various unpleasant tests and having my blood taken, I had the doctor take my blood pressure again. This time, it had returned to normal. I’m convinced that exposure to the television show had raised my blood pressure.

The mind is a sensitive thing. With today’s media tools, it can be easily manipulated. But we pay a price even when we’re able to avoid the primary damage.

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