non-whites and environmentalism

I’ve been reading a leftist race blog (which, for various reasons, I shall not link to).  One particular post deals with the environmentalist movement and claims that non-white environmentalists are not taken seriously by the movement at large.

The post lists several non-white “green activists”:

Van Jones, Majora Carter, Sanjayan, Waagari Matthai, Bryant Terry, Vandana Shiva and Oscar Olivera.

In terms that a leftist might find acceptable, I’ll present my theory on why non-white environmentalists might not be accepted as mainstream.

With the possible exception of Sanjayan, most of the environmentalists listed seem to focus mainly on their own people, their own culture and their own lands.  In contrast, white environmentalists transcend their own race; their own heritage means little or nothing to them and they have given themselves to the world at large.

While it is important for people to focus on their own heritage and to take care of their own kinsmen first, if the face of the environmentalist movement is to cease being so white, then non-white environmentalists need to stop seeing themselves primarily as “African”, “African-American”, “Native American” etc. and act and behave as citizens of the world.  Their books and articles need to appeal to the Human Race and not just to their own race.

The reality of the matter is, of course, that Caucasians have a propensity for altruistic behavior and attitudes.  Therefore it is Caucasians who travel half way around the world to defend total strangers from injustice and environmental degradation.  White as they are, they get “brownie points” for this.  A Guatemalan Indian, protesting the deforestation of his local mountains so that his people will not die in mudslides, may be considered an “environmentalist” on some level but his main interest is in protecting his tribe.  While we should surely applaud, and support, his efforts, we would not be justified in considering him a leader in the global environmentalist movement.

About jewamongyou

I am a paleolibertarian Jew who is also a race-realist. My opinions are often out of the mainstream and often considered "odd" but are they incorrect? Feel free to set me right if you believe so!
This entry was posted in racial differences and how they manifest themselves/race science, shenanigans of the Left and of non-white activists. Bookmark the permalink.

10 Responses to non-whites and environmentalism

  1. Gaurav Ahuja says:

    Unfortunately, the White man’s disease of environmentalism is spreading like cancer. It is especially atrocious for the third world, given their stages of development are behind the first world. Walter Block likes to state that environmentalists are watermelons. They are green on the outside and red(communist) on the inside. Of course, many of them were former communists who just found another anti-human, socialist, and regressive ideology to force upon children, government, and private companies. Many people will point out they aren’t that extreme or they just care about clean water or a lack of harmful pollution. Did people not want these things before the environmentalist movement? If you are still skeptical here are a couple of articles for your awareness. http://mises.org/daily/1269
    http://mises.org/daily/1927

    • jewamongyou says:

      Well Gaurav, call me naive but when I think “environmentalist”, I think of somebody who simply wants to protect the environment – which is a good thing. It is unfortunate that many, who call themselves by this name, are also communists and statists. Madison Grant was an environmentalist – but there was much in him to admire.

    • fred says:

      I agree with GA that environmentalism is overrun with commies, whackos and algore. But clean air and water are still good things. That’s why I consider myself a “conservationist” instead.

  2. Brian says:

    ***Madison Grant was an environmentalist – but there was much in him to admire.***

    Ecologist Garrett Hardin has an interesting essay on lifeboat ethics.

    “Environmentalists use the metaphor of the earth as a “spaceship” in trying to persuade countries, industries and people to stop wasting and polluting our natural resources. Since we all share life on this planet, they argue, no single person or institution has the right to destroy, waste, or use more than a fair share of its resources.

    But does everyone on earth have an equal right to an equal share of its resources? The spaceship metaphor can be dangerous when used by misguided idealists to justify suicidal policies for sharing our resources through uncontrolled immigration and foreign aid. In their enthusiastic but unrealistic generosity, they confuse the ethics of a spaceship with those of a lifeboat.

    A true spaceship would have to be under the control of a captain, since no ship could possibly survive if its course were determined by committee. Spaceship Earth certainly has no captain; the United Nations is merely a toothless tiger, with little power to enforce any policy upon its bickering members.

    If we divide the world crudely into rich nations and poor nations, two thirds of them are desperately poor, and only one third comparatively rich, with the United States the wealthiest of all. Metaphorically each rich nation can be seen as a lifeboat full of comparatively rich people. In the ocean outside each lifeboat swim the poor of the world, who would like to get in, or at least to share some of the wealth. What should the lifeboat passengers do?

    First, we must recognize the limited capacity of any lifeboat. For example, a nation’s land has a limited capacity to support a population and as the current energy crisis has shown us, in some ways we have already exceeded the carrying capacity of our land.”

    http://www.garretthardinsociety.org/articles/art_lifeboat_ethics_case_against_helping_poor.html

  3. Brandon says:

    I’ve read in several places that Hitler was also an environmentalist….

  4. Gay State Girl says:

    JAY
    Have you read The Ecological Indian by Shepard Krech. It dispels the notion that Indians were entirely respectful with their environment. For example the great plains states were once covered in forests. Several tribes set them on fire.

  5. Annoyed says:

    I consider myself an environmentalist but I certainly am not a leftist when it comes to race.

    I am environmentalist for the same reasons I support White Nationalism.

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