My Portland Confederate flag walk

I just got back from walking all over downtown Portland with my full-sized Confederate battle flag. I started at Pioneer Courthouse Square, where a couple of Hispanic men asked me what flag I was holding. I told them it represents the downtrodden and oppressed. That it’s a symbol large corporations, and wealthy special interests want to abolish. They smiled and wished me luck.

Since there weren’t many people in that location, I chose to walk a few blocks to the Portland Timbers game, which was taking place just then. On the way, a man stopped me and thanked me for taking a stand. he shook my hand.

As I got closer to the stadium, I got some negative reactions from passers-by. I made sure to fly it on the overpass, so that passing traffic could see it. At the stadium, I waved it high, so that the hundreds of thousands of fans could see it from their seats. I had a conversation with one of the workers there, who understood my motivations, and gave me a “pinky handshake” through the fence.

Walking back toward the Waterfront, somebody shrieked obscenities at me from her car. She kept yelping until her voice grew raw. It gave me great satisfaction; let the leftists endure some of OUR “propaganda” for a change.

It was difficult to distinguish between the thumbs-ups and the “f-you” fingers I was getting from cars, so I just smiled at everyone and kept walking. A couple of people commended me for my courage, but expressed concern for my safety. All the negative reactions I got were from white people. Blacks seemed to be more amused than anything else.

Going through Waterfront Park, I had a few vulgarities hurled at me, and I posed for a couple of photos as well. One photographer has already sent me one of his shots. it’s included at the end of this post. One construction worker proclaimed, “Now that’s my man!” At about the same time, another shrill leftist was barking at me to “take that sh-t to Alabama etc. etc.”

Why did I do this alone? Because, unfortunately, I couldn’t find anybody to join me. Why did I do it in the first place? Because the battle flag, in and of itself, is neutral. It neither hates nor loves. It doesn’t hurt, or help, people. The stadium worker asked me why I didn’t pick another symbol, one less “hateful.” The answer is that I was not the one to pick this symbol as the one I chose to defend. It was corporate America, and wealthy special-interests, that chose it for me. They have far more power than I do. With their billions, they’re able to purchase the minds of the masses, and brainwash them into demonizing an entire people: Southerners, and any historic symbol that’s associated with them. I explained, to the stadium worker, that this symbol is not just a symbol of Southern whites, but of Southern blacks as well. It was a black student who fought for the right to fly the Confederate flag from his dorm room.

I did it in order to exercise my freedom of speech while I still can. One young man, sitting in his car, commented, “I thought that was illegal!” Some day it might be, but for the time being, I’ll use my rights to the fullest – to show my support for the downtrodden, and to piss off leftists.

Considering the amount of attention I attracted, and the many photos that were taken of me, I’m guessing this stunt will have shock-waves. Either way, I hope to do it again.

The photographer just sent me the shots he took. I’m not particularly fond of the pose, but it was at his request.

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About jewamongyou

I am a paleolibertarian Jew who is also a race-realist. My opinions are often out of the mainstream and often considered "odd" but are they incorrect? Feel free to set me right if you believe so!
This entry was posted in activism, freedom of speech issues and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

13 Responses to My Portland Confederate flag walk

  1. Zimriel says:

    We are dispersed around the country. (I recall there might even be a word for that.)

    But we are -not- alone, even in cities like Portland, as you’ve found.

  2. countenance says:

    A+.

    Notice who gave you the positive reaction.

  3. missattempts says:

    My 90 year old father has lived to see the destruction of this country.
    He is a World War 2 veteran.
    If he could have seen the future of America, he would have not of
    believed it possible. A nation intentionally committing suicide,
    all in the name of “good” and “equality.”
    Why couldn’t people see that they were destroying themselves?
    Because of the powers of darkness that always masqurade as “good.”
    2015 America is in the bonds of Satan, and it will take a miracle to
    free it.

  4. Hacienda says:

    Great idea. You should be allowed to fly any flag you wish. I mean any flag.

  5. Nyk says:

    Wow. You are one brave man. I don’t think I would muster the courage to do anything similar to this, I am pretty much ashamed to admit it. I am not American, but European but my heart also bleeds when I see what Paris and the whole of France have become, led by the same kind of people that have banned the Confederate flag in the US. We Europeans have become so passive that ironically it’s up to the few Jews of noble heart to fight on our behalf, against forces that are even being led by a few of their own.

    If there is a God, then God bless you and give you health and long life!

  6. Anonymous says:

    “I told them it represents the downtrodden and oppressed. That it’s a symbol large corporations, and wealthy special interests want to a abolish. They smiled and wished me luck.”

    That’s great!

  7. Anonymous says:

    “With their billions, they’re able to purchase the minds of the masses, and brainwash them into demonizing an entire people: Southerners, and any historic symbol that’s associated with them.”

    “I did it in order to exercise my freedom of speech while I still can.”

    These lines are also great!

  8. Jagdflieger says:

    Wow… that took guts, JAY! How many of us reading this blog, myself included, can muster the courage this man has? God bless you, sir!

  9. Stealth says:

    Mr. H,… I salute you. I would have walked with you if I lived in Portland. Viva El Sur!

    • Stealth says:

      I don’t care if they take it down at the courthouse, but if people like it, they should feel free to fly it or wear it.

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